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Thread: Water over bow??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    61

    Default Water over bow??

    2002 Princess craft 16'
    Had a 25HP Merc
    Just got a new 50HP Suzuki 4-stroke
    Haven't even put any hours on it yet.

    The main place we boat is on the trent severn waterway in Ontario, Canada (Large River)

    I not going to say its a huge issue all the time but when larger boats are coming towards us and are inconsiderate of their wake the pontoon will ride the wake up and then turtle the bow under going down, from my google'ing I guess people call this "submarining" is there a better way to handle this to keep the bow from taking water?? My concern is not only the people on the pontoon but having the motor pop out of the water while is its running can't be good and to tell the truth I can't afford to buy another motor ..... outboards are $$$$$$$.......

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    6,206

    Default

    Try to take the waves at a 45 degree angle. Slow down and see if you can time your speed to ride over the wave, but not into the trough between the next wave. Can be tricky on a busy lake and even more so, if you don't have enough HP to power over them. Also trim the motor out to get the bow high as possible. Also, move excess weight toward the rear of the boat. {Coolers, People, Etc.) Wouldn't worry about the water pump for the few seconds the motor may rise out of the water. Still water in the engine for short periods.
    Rick

    St. Louis/Lake of the Ozarks

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Thanks Rick for the feedback.... I think there are a few factors here. The length of boat being only 16' we tend to crest the top of the wake, ride it down as the new wake is hitting the bow which brings the stern out of the water, so its the wave frequency as an issue. I have tried the 45deg method and we still get the second wake hitting the top side bow again when the frequency of waves are tight (large wakes off big boats, slow moving) the stern is up on the back side crest while the bow is in the trough not yet on the second wave. When I see boats with these kind of wakes I'm the A*SHOLE yelling and point at the waves to the other boat then telling people on my boat to hold tight and move to the back as much as possible, it can disconcerting and scary feeling.
    I am going to keep trying and play with the 45deg method with speed adjustments, see what works but even a fast moving choppy water we can take water over the bow.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    6,206

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    A smaller boat does make the situation much worse. Not enough length to bridge the waves. I have been known to turn away from very large waves to avoid the submarine effect if I know I cannot ride them out. Then turn back and continue on. Not the best scenario, bur beats going under. Perhaps others with smaller toons will have more ideas..
    Rick

    St. Louis/Lake of the Ozarks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Edwardsville, IL
    Posts
    281

    Default

    Maybe get a 150 hp engine & hammer it when you see a big wake coming. At 35 mph you should be able zip right over the crests. All extra weight in back of course.
    1994 Tracker Party Cruiser
    115 hp Merc, 2 stroke

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    71

    Default

    While we are responsible for damage caused our own wake to shore, docks, and other fixed objects... we share responsibility for hazards to other boats which are “underway” attempting to navigate within or across our wake.* That responsibility lies with the captain of the other boat. As captains WE are responsible for the safe operation of our own vessel and it’s occupants and towed/pushed barges and their occupants.
    It sounds as if you are operating your vessel in hazardous waters and that your vessel is not equipped to navigate those waters without advanced handling-techniques. Rickdb1 has a technique that can work successfully when approached by vessels traveling in an opposing direction. When larger vessels are passing in the SAME direction it may be helpful to adjust your speed to remain upon the upward side of the crest and only allow the other vessel’s wake to pass-by slowly to avoid a “following sea” from coming over the transom.

    *The question may arise as to Who is responsible for wake-damage when another vessel (such as your own) is anchored.... And that begs either the question “WHY are you anchored in a channel?” ... or.... “Why is the passing vessel making a dangerous wake in an anchorage?” The answer to those questions will reveal the responsible party.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by FogHorn; 07-08-2020 at 05:50 PM. Reason: Correction to choice of words
    2015 SouthBay 522FCR w/150 Yamaha

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Boat at Lake of the Ozarks Missouri
    Posts
    614

    Default

    Hi Huggyd :
    OK, I'll take a shot at some comments that might make sense.

    First, may I ask if your boat has under-skinning ? If not then it follows that this aluminum barrier
    MAY add some protection to the cross beam deck supports that might be getting caught in the next
    coming wave and forcing the bow down even further.

    If not under skinned, at least try to add the aluminum skin to the first 3 or 4 feet
    under the deck at the bow. This area alone may help if it is not possible to skin the entire under deck.
    It is amazing how much force is applied to the bow when the cross beams "catch" a wave form.

    Secondly, at the risk of stepping into the abyss, why are you out when conditions appear to be too rough for the size & type
    of vessel you are trying to enjoy. No offense given but I'm sensing this area of waterway seems to be populated by Captains
    that don't practice the "Rules of the Road". Other boaters may not sense the danger they present to your vessel.

    Finally, examine your weight distribution, (passengers, coolers, items on deck, anchors stored under bow seats) etc. to see if these things
    can be better distributed. Timing is everything in life and boating when encountering rough waters. Are the bow fins on the front of the
    pontoons in good shape to deflect as much water as possible, not just spray but real dense water ?

    Good luck with a solution but this may be a fair weather voyage situation however I don't fault you for wanting to enjoy your boat
    and company. Recreation is what we all strive for unless we are in the commercial fishing business.

    Be safe, be careful. Get a really loud air horn and warn off those inconsiderate "Captains"
    Captain Tony
    2005 Summit by Triton - 220T Platinum 3Log
    2005 115HP Mercury Optimax - 228 Marine Master Trailer
    St. Louis & Lake of the Ozarks, MO.

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