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Thread: Tire Pressure

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kennesaw, Ga
    Posts
    327

    Default Tire Pressure

    I can't read the rating on the tires, what would you suggest for tire pressure for a 23' pontoon on a random trailer ?
    2012 Excursion X23C
    90hp Yamaha 4 stroke
    Duel Axle Trailer ready to go anywhere
    All pulled with Z71 4WD Silveradro
    Maritime Mobile KD4LZL
    Lake Allatoona, NW Ga.
    FSO USCG Auxiliary
    Vietnam 66 / 67

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Raystown Country, PA
    Posts
    2,259

    Default

    45 to 55 psi, but Tony might know a better plan, I think he jockeyed trailers a lot in the past.

    My friend's son married into a big tire shop, he told me to run small trailer tires at the max, which on my pontoon is 70 psi, but I never have, mine are at 55.
    2006 Forester 19 Fish (new deck and carpet, Pontoonstuff interior, 2019)
    1996 Mercury 50 ELPT4S
    1983 Sea Nymph FM171 Striper (complete rebuild from hull up, 2014)
    1985 Johnson 70 J70ELCO

    Raystown Country, PA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kennesaw, Ga
    Posts
    327

    Default

    55 is what I was thinking....... Thanks
    2012 Excursion X23C
    90hp Yamaha 4 stroke
    Duel Axle Trailer ready to go anywhere
    All pulled with Z71 4WD Silveradro
    Maritime Mobile KD4LZL
    Lake Allatoona, NW Ga.
    FSO USCG Auxiliary
    Vietnam 66 / 67

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Boat at Lake of the Ozarks Missouri
    Posts
    680

    Default

    First to venture an answer to your question. For a 23 foot boat with a 90HP outboard on a Dual axle trailer; I say 50 - 55 psi when cold.
    The tires will build pressure when warm or hot after running on the highway so air them up cold and don't bleed them down after you stop
    for gas after running 65-70 MPH to your destination.

    Now for the un-asked question, why can't the tire information be read ? I would suggest spraying some windex or rubbing alcohol on the
    information block and it will bring out the numbers. Go with the tire manufacturers recommendation for 5 PSI less than MAX. Again cold.
    Captain Tony
    2005 Summit by Triton - 220T Platinum 3Log
    2005 115HP Mercury Optimax - 228 Marine Master Trailer
    St. Louis & Lake of the Ozarks, MO.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Live in the Raeford NC area.
    Posts
    74

    Default

    My towing capacity is 6000 lbs and the boat is about 4500 or so.
    I do not by any means do 70 mph while towing. First of all, most of the roads I have to take to the lakes since I am not fortunate to have a lake house does not exceed 55mph and most are less. Plus, they are not wide at all and I have to extremely aware of where my trailer tires are riding.
    Another reason I don't entertain 70mph when I could do it, the trailer becomes a little less stable.
    Speed on the water and speed off the water is not what I am looking for. A fun and safe time and getting home ok so I can do it again is my goal.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Boat at Lake of the Ozarks Missouri
    Posts
    680

    Default

    Well said Richinnc:
    I didn't mean to insinuate that you in particular are a 70 MPH towing person, although I have been
    passed on the interstates by many a boat pushing a car/truck in a rapid fashion.

    Trailers are a funny business, I'm still amazed that they hang on to that 2" ball with faithful attention.
    As to squirrelly handling at speed it is usually a product of insufficient tongue weight but not always.

    Just for grins and personal knowledge try putting your trailer tongue on a scale when the trailer is level and see if you have 10%
    or there about on the tongue. Lighter than that and you may need to re balance the boat or move the axles if they can be slid rearward a bit.
    About 9 to 15% of total boat & trailer weight, with fuel and equipment is what I would shoot for.

    Anyway good luck and have a great boating summer.
    Captain Tony
    2005 Summit by Triton - 220T Platinum 3Log
    2005 115HP Mercury Optimax - 228 Marine Master Trailer
    St. Louis & Lake of the Ozarks, MO.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Live in the Raeford NC area.
    Posts
    74

    Default

    No offense taken at all Tony. I will say though that my trailer tires have like a 90 lbs inflation label and I cant imagine inflating them that much. I too go to about 55 on all four tires.
    One thing I have added to my trailer is just above and a little forward of each tire I have attached one of those 2 inch LED lights. When the trailer lights are on (always) they flood
    the area around the tires with a soft light that allows me to see where my tires are tracking especially on dark rainy roads. My side mirrors are angles to see the tires and I use my back
    facing camera to see what is behind me.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Boat at Lake of the Ozarks Missouri
    Posts
    680

    Default

    Outstanding idea. If I ever go back to towing further than the ramp 200 feet from the lakehouse:
    I'll do just that. Thanks for the tip.

    HAPPY 4th OF JULY TO ALL THE PDB FORUM PARTICIPANTS.
    Captain Tony
    2005 Summit by Triton - 220T Platinum 3Log
    2005 115HP Mercury Optimax - 228 Marine Master Trailer
    St. Louis & Lake of the Ozarks, MO.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    122

    Default

    What is missing in this thread is information regarding tire size, load rating, and trailer weight when loaded. Most tires have on their sidewalls information stating their maximum carrying capacity (load capacity) and the tire pressure which accommodates that load. Usually that pressure is the inflation that brings that tire to it’s maximum strength in terms of carrying-capacity... but the penalty is a harsh ride and uneven tire-wear at light loads. The operator’s choice is between maximum safety or maximum tire life... and in most cases those lines cross at max capacity/pressures. Operating at lower than max capacity pressure also shortens tire life because it subjects the tire sidewalls to the potential for heat-damage and bruising from striking objects in the road.
    I operate several different trailers (boat, utility, ag, travel/camper, etc) and I always operate them at max pressure listed on the sidewall.
    Don’t forget tires have chronological lives also, usually recommended by mfr’s at 6 yrs regardless of mileage or tread wear indicators. Hope this helps.

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